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Article
October 20, 1906

WHAT SHOULD WE TEACH THE PUBLIC REGARDING VENEREAL DISEASE?

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(16):1252-1253. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210160016001g
Abstract

Let us briefly consider, first, what we do teach regarding venereal disease; second, what deduction the average layman draws from information received, and, third, in what way our teaching may prevent the spread of infection.

As physicians we teach the public by precept and by example; we do not give systematic lectures or demonstrations to laymen; we give brief and fragmentary personal talks to our own sons (generally not to our daughters); to the children of our patients occasionally, but generally after the acquirement of disease and not before; very occasionally a few lectures are given to young men as members of a college or school or church, but never, to my knowledge, to young women. Now and then one learns of a class of men being instructed in methods of prophylaxis. That is all, except such fragmentary individual instruction as the physician gives to his venereal patients. What can

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