[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.206.194.134. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 20, 1897

ACROMEGALY—WITH A CASE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of obstetrics and diseases of children and clinical medicine, chattanooga medical college. chattanooga, tenn.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(12):540-542. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440120014002e

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Dr. Paul Marie of Paris, in 1886, gave to the medical world a classic description of certain rare pathologic conditions and appearances to which, though noted possibly for many years, he gave the name Acromegaly, thus adding to medical nomenclature a new word. This word is a combination of two Greek words, meaning enlarged extremity. But the term is elastic enough to cover more territory than just what its root words signify, so that in general, acromegaly may be defined as a symmetrical enlargement of the extremities and face.

Reported cases studied to the present time apparently fix five facts, viz., that hereditary influences cut no figure in causation; that the disease usually appears between 12 and 30 years of age; preponderates in males; that theorists are at sea as to the causes, and that all treatment up to date is unavailing.

To account for the simultaneous and abnormal growth

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×