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Article
July 9, 1904

THE DANGER OF ALLOWING WARTS AND MOLES TO REMAIN LEST THEY BECOME MALIGNANT.WITH TWENTY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIVE CASES.

Author Affiliations

Professor of the Principles of Surgery and of Clinical Surgery, Jefferson Medical College. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(2):96-105. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500020002a
Abstract

The title of this paper indicates its purpose. It is chiefly a clinical paper, intended to emphasize the danger of not removing warts and moles, and sometimes nevi, lest they should become malignant, with 25 cases of such malignant degeneration, 12 from my own patients and 13 histories kindly furnished me by friends. Of course, the great majority of such growths never do undergo malignant degeneration, but as one can never tell which will and which will not become malignant, it is of the utmost importance, unless circumstances render it inadvisable, that they should be removed before a malignant change occurs.

Many moles and warts are congenital; others arise later in life, either in childhood or adult life, and still others frequently appear in elderly people. The ordinary warts which are so common on the hands of children, and which, as a rule, disappear as the child grows older, are

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