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Article
July 9, 1904

HUMAN BEINGS AND THE PARASITE OF TEXAS CATTLE FEVER.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(2):128. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02500020042010
Abstract

The recent discovery that the so-called "spotted fever" of the Bitter Root Valley is due to an intracorpuscular blood parasite of the species piroplasma, and the added knowledge that the disease is, in all probability, transmitted by a species of tick, might lead us, on theoretic grounds alone, to suspect that Texas cattle fever might be transmitted to man. As far as we know, there has never been in this country a reported case of such a character, but Lingard1 has recently brought up the question in India, where he has observed a case which he regards as a mixed malaria and piroplasma infection in a cattle tender. The history of the case certainly supports Lingard's views, as do the excellent illustrations which accompany his paper. If such an infection can occur in India, we can see no reason why it can not occur in this country also, and

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