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Article
November 10, 1906

PREGNANCY AND LABOR COMPLICATED BY ANTERIOR FIXATION OF THE UTERUS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Midwifery to the Medico-Chirogical College; Physician to the Philadelphia Lying-in Charity. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(19):1528-1531. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210190008001e
Abstract

In 1886, ventrofixation was welcomed. We felt that at last a positive means for curing the retroverted uterus had been found. The early operations surely accomplished the purpose sought for. The uterus was firmly fixed to the anterior abdominal wall by sutures; in some cases, in addition to this, extensive scarifications produced strong fibrous adhesions. The results of these operations were most gratifying. The symptoms complained of disappeared rapidly. All went well until we began to hear of complications developing during pregnancy and labor, complications causing so much obstruction by the firm and thickened anterior wall of the uterus that at times the most serious operations in obstetrics were demanded in order to accomplish the delivery.

With the news of these complications, cases that only time could produce, we now find the various operators modifying the procedure, some using a single stitch to fix the uterus, others removing all sutures

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