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Article
August 1, 1896

PUERPERAL INFECTION; ITS PATHOLOGY, PREVENTION AND TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(5):234-236. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430830004001a
Abstract

The term "puerperal fever" should be abandoned, as it is too broad and includes conditions which are not peculiar to the puerperal state, hence misleading.

Puerperal septicemia as used by many is also objectionable; it should be limited in its application and used only to indicate cases of true septicemia. Textbooks and lexicons define "puerperal fever" as an acute infectious disease due to septic inoculation. Some authorities apologize for the definition, and well they may under the present light and knowledge of these conditions.

In writing upon this subject, some five years since, for the Tri-State Medical Association I endeavored to demonstrate the existence of two general classes of puerperal infection. Such a view then met with strong opposition and some of our best authorities wrote me such a distinction could not be maintained. To-day I am more fully convinced than ever that we have a septic and a putrid

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