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Article
July 23, 1904

CONTINUOUS ACRODERMATITIS.AN INSTANCE WHERE IT WAS CONTROLLED BY THE X-RAY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Diseases of the Skin, Medical Department of the University of California. SAN FRANCISCO.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(4):255-256. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500040002g
Abstract

Very few writers now believe eczema to be one disease. It is a vast agglomerate of diseases, out of which clinical types are being slowly segregated. In pursuance of this theory, Hallopeau in 1897 proposed1 to remove a group of cases out of the general class of eczema, and to call the group "the continued acrodermatites." Cases constituting this group are characterized by their location on the extremities of the members, more particularly on the fingers and toes, by their incessant recurrence in the affected locality, by their not extending for a long time to any other region of the body, and by their obstinate resistance to treatment.

Three forms of this malady are described—a vesicular form, a pustular form, and a form where there are both vesicles and pustules, constituting [ill] vesiculopustular form.

The case under consideration would fall in the vesicular group. The disease

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