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Article
April 24, 1897

THE OCCURRENCE OF SUGAR IN THE URINE; ITS CLASSIFICATION, ETIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY.NUMBER I.

Author Affiliations

ASSISTANT SURGEON, U. S. ARMY, FORT ASSINNIBOINE, MONTANA.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(17):767-769. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440170001001

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Abstract

The term diabetes mellitus is usually indiscriminately applied to a disease prominently characterized by an excess of sugar in the blood and by the occurrence of this body in the urine in varying amounts, this condition persisting over a greater or less length of time.

The occurrence of sugar in the urine may be primarily divided into the physiologic and the pathologic, the former being again separated into two classes: 1. That condition in which, as ordinarily found in health, the quantity of sugar present in the urine is too small to be detected by the usual clinical, tests as by Fehling's solution, by fermentation, etc. That a certain amount is, however, normally present in health has been repeatedly demonstrated by the more delicate gravimetric method, so that the increased amount of sugar often found in a urine may be simply due to the increased activity of a perfectly physiologic

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