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Article
January 19, 1907

TRYPSIN TREATMENT OF A CASE OF MALIGNANT DISEASE, INVOLVING THE LEFT TONSIL, BASE OF TONGUE AND EPIGLOTTIS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology in the Post-Graduate Medical School, Chicago. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(3):225-226. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220290041002d

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Abstract

Patient and History.  —J. H., aged 56, hotel clerk, of good family history; has had gonorrhea, but denies having had syphilis. On Sept. 1, 1905, the patient weighed 168 pounds, and about this time complained of pain over the left side of the face, which later became more manifest along the left lower jaw, in the ear, and from the occiput to the vertex. As the pain was unrelieved he had five left lower teeth and two back upper teeth extracted. He was treated at various hospitals and clinics until May 9, 1906, when I first saw him at the Post-Graduate Hospital. At that time he could not protrude his tongue and swallowed with much difficulty the smallest amount of liquid, impulsively placing his hand as though to support the lower jaw. His speech was thick and indistinct, he had left facial paralysis and complained of constant pain radiating over

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