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Article
October 8, 1904

OSMIC ACID INJECTIONS FOE BELIEF OF TRIFACIAL NEURALGIA.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(15):1051-1057. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500150001g

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Abstract

CLINICAL CASES. 

Case 1.  —Mr. A. L. C, age 76 years, retired farmer. Admitted to Mercy Hospital June 8, 1903.

Present Illness.  —For thirteen years has suffered from neuralgic pains in right side of face, but they were not very severe or constant until four years ago. At that time he had a severe attack which he thought was caused by a diseased right upper cuspid. The tooth was removed about two months after the onset, and for six weeks following he was relieved. Pain then recurred and was severe and persistent. Two years ago he had an operation performed on the right superior maxilla, the exact nature of which he does not know. He was free from pain for four months after the operation, but at the end of that time it returned and has been present, at intervals, ever since. The pain is of a severe shooting character, beginning at right ala nasi and radiating toward cheek. He also has some pain in the forehead, just above the right eyebrow, radiating toward temple. General health has been fair for a man of his years.

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