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October 8, 1904

BACILLUS DYSENTERIÆ IN THE SUMMER DIARRHEAS OF INFANTS.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(15):1066-1067. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02500150048006
Abstract

In searching in the intestinal contents or dejecta for bacteria which might be the cause of an infectious disease, investigators have often mistaken the organism present in largest number for the one sought, and have overlooked the specific one which was present in much smaller number. This had been the case in the study of dysentery until Shiga, in 1898, made use of the agglutinating property of the blood of the infected person on the specific organism, to separate it from the other intestinal bacteria. The work of subsequent investigators in various parts of the world seems to have determined that typical dysentery, aside from the amebic form, is always due to the bacilli which are closely related to the one originally described by Shiga. Some of these bacilli have been shown to cause typical dysenteric lesions in experimental animals.

These fruitful investigations in connection with dysentery led to the

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