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Article
May 22, 1897

NERVOUS DYSPEPSIA.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(21):959-962. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440210001001

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Abstract

Gentlemen:  —You have recently had opportunities for witnessing the effects of inflammation of the mucous coat of the stomach in several patients who have exhibited, with varying degrees of severity, the symptoms of acute and chronic gastritis. This morning I wish to call your attention to a case that illustrates another form of gastric disturbance—nervomuscular dyspepsia. It has been taught by the dominant school of pathologists that such disturbances of digestion are always due to catarrhal gastroenteritis. But the opinion has long been held, and is gaining ground, that in certain cases the disorder of digestion is dependent upon alterations in the nervous system, and that inflammation takes little or no part in its causation. This is apparently true of the gastric crises of tabes dorsalis; though, in default of an autopsy, it is always possible to imagine the existence of a latent inflammation that is only prominent during a

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