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Article
October 22, 1904

THE DIFFERENTIAL LEUCOCYTE COUNT AS AN AID TO THE DIAGNOSIS OF FEVERS.

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS, TENN.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(17):1202-1209. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500170001e
Abstract

The factors influencing the movements of leucocytes are but imperfectly understood, hence a system of diagnosis based on a variation of the colorless elements in the peripheral blood is not without some hazard, yet it must be admitted that practically all we know of the physiology of the blood has been worked out in the clinical and pathologic laboratory. Stimulated by the reports to the Royal Society and observations of other workers in malarial districts, and feeling guilty of some negligence in this field in the past, I made random observations for some years which led to a systematic investigation of some 200 blood spreads with a view to ascertaining the diagnostic value of the malarial leucocyte variation.

Malarial blood has been found to vary within very wide limits, and the colorless cells show a percentage so nearly like that of typhoid fever, from which we have to differentiate

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