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Article
May 22, 1897

A CASE OF INFANTILE ATRESIA OF THE NASAL FOSSÆ, WITH UNUSUALLY RAPID RESPIRATION.

Author Affiliations

INSTRUCTOR IN DEPARTMENT OF DISEASES OF THE EAR PHILADELPHIA POLYCLINIC, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(21):977. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440210019002f
Abstract

Paul B., aged three months, was referred to me on Feb. 28, 1897. When born he was covered with eczematous scales, which at the time of his first visit had cleared up, with the exception of a few scaly areas on the scalp. He had been given bichlorid of mercury and iodid of potassium for the above condition by the mouth. He was apparently healthy and well nourished, but for the scales spoken of and his remarkably rapid breathing. His respirations were short and shallow, and numbered about 105 to the minute. His physician told me that he had had continuous rapid and noisy breathing since birth and occasionally had attacks simulating laryngismus stridulus. During these attacks his breathing became very labored; he became cyanotic, struggled for breath, and his condition became so alarming as to make recovery seem impossible. These attacks he had weekly, and at times oftener. It

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