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Article
October 22, 1904

REFLEX APNEA AND CARDIAC INHIBITION IN OPERATIONS ON THE RESPIRATORY TRACT.

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Laryngology. University of Pennsylvania,; Demonstrator of Physiology, Medico-Chirurgical College. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(17):1221-1225. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500170001h
Abstract

The following case, reported elsewhere by one of us,1 gives some idea of the practical importance of this subject:

In 1900 one of my students came to me for an explanation of certain curious phenomena that occurred during massage of an epithelioma of the lower lip. It was about 1 1/4 inches in diameter and surrounded by an indurated area. The center was very sensitive. When this part was massaged the patient cried: "Don't cut my wind off! You are choking me!" He gripped the chair and grew dark in the face, breathing hard, with a pulse of 100, subsiding quickly to 20; respiration about 12. Massage next day caused the same alarming symptoms.

No doubt it was a case of reflex inhibition caused by mechanical stimulation of the abnormally sensitive endings of the trifacial.

Reflex inhibition has not received from laryngologiste the attention it deserves. The text-books

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