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Article
June 19, 1897

INTESTINAL ANASTOMOSIS.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON TO THE ST. ELIZABETH AND GERMAN HOSPITALS. CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(25):1163-1166. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440250005001b

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Abstract

The subject which I am about to touch upon is an ever interesting one. I would like to relate the early history of our instructors in surgery, in the line of intestinal anastomosis, but were I to attempt such a task I would be called a monopolist of time. Suffice it for me to state, that they, even 150 years ago, realized the necessity of some speedy and safe method for dealing with this most important branch of surgery. They were evidently not satisfied with the suture method, as is manifest by their numerous attempts to call unto their aid mechanical means, such as steel rings, rawhide, turnips, bone, catgut, rings, gelatin, etc. Denan, in an article in "Receuil de la Société Royale de Médecine de Marseille," l'an 1826, described his device for intestinal anastomosis, consisting of steel rings connected with a spring, and laid stress upon the pressure necrosis

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