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Article
January 1, 1898

THE MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN WITH AN INHERITED TUBERCULAR DIATHESIS.

Author Affiliations

ORANGE, N. J.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(1):18-22. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440530018002f

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Abstract

There are diverse views concerning the so-called inherited tubercular diathesis; some even deny the existence of such a thing; others fully believe in it. Vogel is one of the latter. He regards heredity as an important etiologic factor in the production of infantile tuberculosis, because children born of parents affected with this disease develop it when exposed to bad hygienic surroundings. Baumgarten thinks there is a virus transmitted from parent to offspring. Bend is arrayed against him. Edward Squire of London from a study of 1,000 cases concludes that heredity accounts for 9 per cent, of cases among children born of phthisic parents, in excess of cases among children of non-phthisic parents. He therefore believes that heredity in these cases means simply a tendency to suffer from diseases, tuberculosis among others, which all children born of weakly parents have in common. Dr. Solomon Solis-Cohen says, "to make our conception of

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