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December 24, 1904

THE RELATION OF THE PHYSICIAN TO SANITATION.CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS BEFORE THE SECTION ON HYGIENE AND SANITARY SCIENCE, AT THE FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AT ATLANTIC CITY, JUNE 7-10, 1904.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(26):1917-1924. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500260001a

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Abstract

On the question of hygiene and sanitation much, if not all, of the practice of medicine rests. The nearer that the individual personally and the nearer the public or masses of individuals collectively live and conduct themselves in accordance with the conditions provided by Nature, so much less will be the need of medical interference. What asepsis is to the surgeon, perfect hygiene is to the medical practitioner. Unfortunately, however, under the stress of accomplishment of great results in every line of effort except that of health, Nature's pristine conditions are forgotten and abuse of all her natural laws follows.

In the effort of the ignorant mother to improve on the diet provided by Nature, she seeks to add to the infant's strength by feeding it with all sorts of indigestible foods. The woman of knowledge, striving for social eminence, forces on her infant a diet, scientific

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