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Article
August 16, 1890

PROSTATITIS AND PROSTATIC ABSCESS.Read by Title in the Section of Surgery and Anatomy at the Forty-first Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, Nashville, Tenn., May, 1890.

Author Affiliations

DEMONSTRATOR AND LECTURER ON OSTEOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, SURGEON TO THE EPISCOPAL, ST. MARY'S, AND OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITALS, ETC.

JAMA. 1890;XV(7):247-251. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410330015001c

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Abstract

In entering upon a study of certain pathological conditions of the prostate, there appears to exist a peculiar necessity for observing accurately its normal structure, conformation and anatomical relations with the rectum and the bladder on one hand and the urethra on the other.

The prostate is commonly said to resemble a horse chestnut somewhat in shape and size, the small extremity being directed downwards and forward, and the base upwards and backwards, in the erect position of the body. The upper surface is directed forward to the deep perineal fascia which it touches.

The base is smooth and rests on the rectum, to which it is connected by dense areolar fibrous tissue. When the prostate is thoroughly isolated from the surrounding parts by dissection, it presents something the shape of a truncated cone. The normal adult gland measures about one and one-half inches in its

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