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Article
January 15, 1898

MELANOSARCOMA OF THE CONJUNCTIVA, WITH THE REPORT OF A CASE.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE EYE, EAR AND THROAT, CLEVELAND COL LEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS; OCULIST AND AURIST TO THE CLEVELAND GENERAL, ST. ALEXIS AND CITY HOSPITALS. CLEVELAND, OHIO.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(3):119-121. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440550007001b
Abstract

Mr. G. of Cambridge Springs, Pa., aged 69 years, was first seen in March, 1888, with a dark purplish lobulated tumor of the left eyeball, about three quarters of an inch in length, one-half inch in breadth and about one-half inch in thickness, springing from the ocular conjunctiva on the nasal side. The tumor was first noticed about one year previously as a small dark spot. There was no history of traumatism.

There was diplopia when looking to the right, owing to the tumor preventing the eye rotating in that direction. There was slight haziness of the lower part of the cornea, probably due to the imperfect closure of the lids, but otherwise vision was good. A fairly satisfactory ophthalmoscopic examination was possible, revealing a healthy fundus. The tumor was slightly movable, but I was uncertain whether or no it was adherent to sclerotic or deep orbital structures. There was

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