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Article
January 14, 1905

THE SYMPTOMATIC VALUE OF CHANGES IN THE NAILS.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(2):133. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02500290053008
Abstract

Changes in the nails as a result of trophic influences have scarcely received the attention of which they appear to be deserving. It is true that the curvature of tuberculosis, the stunted growth of hemiplegia, the transverse marking after typhoid fever and the longitudinal striation attending myxedema have been described. In addition, the inflammation of syphilis is characteristic, while the nails sometimes suffer in conjunction with diseases of the skin, for example, favus, psoriasis, tinea. There is, therefore, good reason for believing that the nails may at times furnish evidence of the previous existence of disease perhaps not otherwise recognizable. Dr. E. Feer,1 in a recent communication, calls attention to the formation of a transverse and somewhat curved line in the form of a groove or ridge on the nails, especially on those of the thumbs and the great toes, in the sequence of scarlet fever and measles. In

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