[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 21, 1905

TWO CASES OF OBJECTIVE AURAL TINNITUS DUE TO THE ACTION OF TUBOPALATAL MUSCLES.

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(3):180-184. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500300012001c
Abstract

Subjective noises in the ear, loud, distressing, and of various description, buzzing, ringing, roaring, singing, steaming, whistling, is one of the most familiar symptoms encountered in the practice of otology.

These sounds are sometimes so loud and intense that the afflicted patient is led to think that bystanders can hear them as well as himself, and it not infrequently happens that the physician is asked if he also can not hear the noise which the patient hears so distinctly.

But cognizant of their purely subjective character, the physician usually only laughs at the query.

It is worth while, however, to bear in mind that exceptionally this inquiry on the part of the patient is entirely justified and that if we put our ear close to his, we will discover that the sound, which we thought was heard only subjectively by the patient, may actually be heard objectively by another

×