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Article
January 21, 1905

DENGUE IN THE ISTHMIAN CANAL ZONE.INCLUDING A REPORT ON THE LABORATORY FINDINGS.

Author Affiliations

Surgeon U. S. Navy.; Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Navy.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(3):214-216. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500300046001l
Abstract

Of the several tropical diseases whose etiology is yet in question, dengue undoubtedly stands at the head of the list in importance. It has long been considered an infectious disease, as the writings of Ornstein,1 Eulenberg,2 Graham3 and Hirsch4 attest, while we find Leichenstein,5 Malie,6 von Duringe7 and a half dozen others presenting almost indisputable evidence that it is contagious, in the technical sense of the word, as well.

McLaughlin8 of Texas, in an exhaustive series of studies begun as far back as 1885, undoubtedly establishes the clearest claim to the discovery of the causative agent, but in spite of his clear and concise description of the method of procedure employed, very few investigators have been able to verify the presence in dengue blood of the micrococcus which he found in such large numbers.

Our lack of exact knowledge concerning the morbid anatomy of this infection

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