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Article
January 21, 1905

TRUTH AND POETRY CONCERNING URIC ACID. II.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(3):220-221. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02500300052005
Abstract

The history of uric acid dates from a year easily remembered by Americans. In 1776 the substance was discovered by Karl W. Scheele as the constituent of a concrement, and in the same year T. Bergman found it in a stone from the bladder. Soon after it was recognized as a normal ingredient of the urine; it was fated to become the object of a long series of studies. Pure chemists busied themselves with it for a time, Fourcroy (1793) finding urea among its decomposition products, and Wöhler and Liebig (1838), showing that it is closely related to allantoin, urea and alloxan. The majority of the earlier studies on uric acid were undertaken by medical men, and one of the most interesting features of medical research during the past hundred years is the patient but tortuous course followed by those who had as their object the determining of the mode

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