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Article
February 4, 1905

EXPERIMENTAL STREPTOCOCCUS ARTHRITIS IN RELATION TO THE ETIOLOGY OF ACUTE ARTICULAR RHEUMATISM.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(5):394. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02500320058005
Abstract

In England the view seems to be gaining ground that acute articular rheumatism is caused by a special microorganism—Micrococcus rheumaticus—which has been isolated by various investigators from the blood, the urine and the joints of cases clinically regarded as acute articular rheumatism. Naturally, this view was materially strengthened when it was found that this coccus, which does not present any decisive cultural and morphologic differences from ordinary streptococci, produces arthritis and endocarditis when injected into rabbits. Most recently Beattie,1 for example, after working with an organism obtained from the synovial membrane of a girl with acute rheumatism, came to the conclusion that Micrococcus rheumaticus is a distinct microbe, and the special cause of acute rheumatism.

There seems, however, to be good reason to go slowly in accepting this conclusion as final. There are, indeed, two very weighty objections in particular that must be removed before such acceptance

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