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Article
November 15, 1890

ONE ASPECT OF THE RELATION WHICH PATHOLOGY BEARS TO THERAPEUTICS.

JAMA. 1890;XV(20):721-722. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410460021004

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Abstract

The best part of modern medicine is undoubtedly founded upon a pathological basis, i. e., on the changes in tissues which we can discover by an examination of their gross or minute structures, such changes for the most part being either quantitative or qualitative, physical or chemical. Unfortunately for the human organism, the power of regenerating damaged or changed structures is not inherent in it to any considerable degree.

Certain of the lower animals are capable of reproducing limbs or even organs which have been experimentally or accidentally removed. The lobster can reconstruct a complete and perfect claw, or the tadpole a new tail, and further illustrations of this reconstructive capacity are perfectly familiar to the biologist. In man, however, regeneration is usually limited, with few exceptions, to that important though less highly organized group known as the connective tissues. That a liver cell, for instance, or any other parenchymatous

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