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February 18, 1905

THE SMALL DEATH RATE FROM DISEASE IN THE JAPANESE ARMY.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(7):552. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02500340040008

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Abstract

If the facts reported in the newspapers are correct, the present war in Manchuria, especially as regards the Japanese losses, stands alone among the conflicts of modern times. It is said, on the authority of the chief surgeon of General Oku's army, that, out of presumably 100,000 combatants, only 40 died of disease during the seven months' active campaigning ending December 1. Out of 24,642 cases of disease treated, 18,578 recovered in field hospitals or while on duty; 5,609 were sent home for treatment, leaving only a little over 300 still on the army sick list at date of report. Allowing for considerable mortality among the cases sent to base hospitals in Japan these figures are almost if not absolutely record breaking. The fact is still more remarkable when we notice the record of typhoid fever and dysentery, ordinarily two of the most serious disorders of armies in the field.

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