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Article
April 8, 1905

DISSEMINATION OF STREPTOCOCCI THROUGH INVISIBLE SPUTUM.IN RELATION TO SCARLET FEVER AND SEPSIS.

Author Affiliations

(From the Memorial Institute for Infectious Diseases.) CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(14):1108-1111. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500410032001g
Abstract

INTRODUCTION.  Since the completion of this investigation an article has appeared in the Archiv für Klinische Chirurgie, by Mendes de Leon, describing experiments conducted along the same lines as my own, and having practically the same results. Dr. de Leon calls attention to the work done in Flügge's laboratory which proved the importance of droplets of sputum in the dissemination of tuberculous infection, and comments on the fact that the sputum as a source of infection has apparently been overlooked by surgeons. He instituted experiments similar to those of Flügge, but modified so as to reproduce the conditions of the operating room, and succeeded in proving that the mouth of the operating surgeon is a fruitful source of streptococcal infection. During an ordinary operation, not performed before a class, a surgeon speaks from 150 to 500 words. Plates laid on the table before a number of surgeons while

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