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Article
April 29, 1905

SOME INTERESTING AUTOPSY FINDINGS IN EPILEPTICS.

Author Affiliations

SONYEA, N. Y. [From the Pathological Laboratory of the Craig Colony tor Epileptics.]

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(17):1325-1334. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500440001001
Abstract

When I assumed the duties of pathologist to the Craig Colony, a year ago, the task before me of studying the pathology of epilepsy seemed a hard one, promising but little fruit. That such a pessimistic feeling had justification will be seen from the following passage by an author of such repute as Gowers,1 and whose name is so intimately associated with the subject of epilepsy:

Of the histologie changes revealed by the microscope, most of those which are not common, apart from symptoms, are apparently of secondary origin, the result and not the cause of the convulsions; and the various changes that have been described and have been supposed to be related to the origin of the disease have probably no connection with it, and do not even deserve enumeration. No greater significance can be ascribed to the induration of the cornua ammonis (pes hippocampi) to which weight has been attached by Meynert.

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