[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 6, 1905

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TUBERCULOUS DEPOSITS IN THE TONSILS.

Author Affiliations

From the Laboratory of the State Live-Stock Sanitary Board of Pennsylvania. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(18):1425-1434. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500450013001c
Abstract

The object of the research which is outlined in this paper has been to determine, as nearly as possible, the relative importance of the tonsillar tissues of the throat as portals of entrance for a general tuberculous infection. To arrive at a definite conclusion, it seemed necessary to ascertain the truth concerning certain fundamental questions.

First. Are tuberculous lesions produced more easily in the tonsils than in other portions of the gastrointestinal tract?

Second. Does tuberculous adenitis of the neck have its starting point in the tonsils?

Third. What is the importance of tuberculous cervical adenitis as an etiologic factor in systemic or pul-monic infection?

From clinical data collected from literature, and from postmortem examinations which I have made, it is evident that in cases of pulmonic phthisis secondary tuberculous infection takes place more readily in the tonsils than in any other part of the upper respiratory tract.

×