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May 13, 1905

A BACTEBIOLOGIC AND CLINICAL STUDY OF A CURATIVE SERUM FOR TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(19):1504-1515. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500460009002a
Abstract

Although the production of an effective curative serum for typhoid fever would be a great addition to therapeutics, yet the accomplishment of this result is beset by several difficulties. It is well known that the typhoid bacillus is usually present in the blood and tissues, and that it increases in the tissues. The destruction of the bacilli in the circulation and tissues depends on the successful interaction of two distinct bodies.

The body which actually destroys the typhoid bacillus is the complement and is present as a ferment-like body in the serum or cells of the body. The second substance is usually the product of artificial immunity, though it too may be normally present in the body. It is well known as the intermediary body. Following out the theories of Ehrlich as so clearly explained by Welch.1 in the Huxley lecture for 1902, this intermediary body is produced in an immune serum by means of certain so-called haptophore groups which are possessed by the typhoid bacilli themselves. These groups of atoms have a special affinity for corresponding haptophorous groups in the cells of the body.

The continued appropriation of these receptors by the body cells causes an excessive production of similar receptors on the part of these body cells. Many of

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