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Article
September 20, 1902

THE CAUSAL RELATION OF BLOOD POVERTY TO GASTRIC ULCER: WITH REPORT OF AN ILLUSTRATIVE CASE WITH ATYPICAL SYMPTOMS.

JAMA. 1902;XXXIX(12):695-701. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.52480380031002d
Abstract

As there is perhaps no subject the etiology of which has been so thoroughly thrashed over as that of gastric ulcer, and with so little final satisfaction in the way of a definite conclusion, it may not prove uninteresting to consider the condition with reference to a case that presents strong evidence of an actual causal systemic condition. Although traumatic as well as tubercular and syphilitic ulcers, and similar lesions of the stomach, are infrequent phenomena, when they do occur their etiology is clear because of known existing conditions. The characteristic peptic ulcer, or, as it might be well named, the pyloric ulcer, from its frequent occurrence in this position, gives, however, only a hint as to its causation; and the best writers on the subject satisfy themselves with the statement that in all probability a lesion of the mucous membrane has been present, followed by self-digestion of the gastric

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