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Article
May 27, 1905

STENOSIS OF THE PYLORUS IN INFANCY.AN ANALYSIS OF 115 CASES.

Author Affiliations

Surgeon to the Massachusetts General Hospital; BOSTON.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(21):1665-1671. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500480013001d
Abstract

"The pylorus was invested with a hard, compact substance or schirrhosity, which so completely obstructed the passage into the duodenum as to admit with the greatest difficulty the finest probe." Thus wrote Hezekiah Beardsley1 in 1788 from New Haven, Conn., after having examined the stomach of a child who had had "puking and regurgitation of milk" from birth, but who, although much emaciated, had lived, in spite of this rejection of food, until she was 5 years old.

Beardsley's case of 1788 is the first recorded instance of obstruction at the pylorus occurring in infancy. It is a record of importance. In 1841 Williamson2 recorded the second case of pyloric stenosis. The child died when five weeks old. In 1842 Dawoski3 reported the third instance. This case likewise died when five weeks old. From the time of the case of Dawosky to that of Hirschsprung4 of Copenhagen in 1888, a

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