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Article
May 27, 1905

PERITONEAL GAUZE DRAINAGE.AN EASY METHOD FOR ITS USE THROUGH THE VAGINA, AFTER ABDOMINAL SECTION.

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(21):1679-1681. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500480027001g

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Abstract

The fancied necessity for drainage after abdominal section has been greatly lessened by our knowledge that the peritoneum can easily dispose of considerable amounts of blood and serum and that ancient accumulations of pus are generally sterile. The real necessity for drainage has been greatly minimized by perfected methods of asepticity, by most careful repair of denuded peritoneal surfaces, by efficient hemostasis and control of all oozing, and by avoidance of unnecessary trauma in rude and violent manipulations. Classes of cases that were formerly drained routinely are observed to do quite as well without drainage; yet there is a small minority which requires it.

Abdominal drainage has been very generally abandoned for vaginal drainage when possible, except in general peritonitis, where the very large glass tube above the symphysis, combined, with the upright sitting (Fowler's) position, leaves little to be desired. Glass is slow to excite lymph adhesions and a

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