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Article
June 3, 1905

MEDICAL EDUCATIONWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE SUBJECT OF PHYSIOLOGY.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(22):1731-1735. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500490007001c
Abstract

I realize that this subject is not one calculated to arouse very enthusiastic interest among general practitioners; nevertheless, I am firmly convinced that, until the general profession takes a more abiding and discriminating interest in the subject of medical education, American medicine will hold itself open to such criticism, whether just or unjust, as has recently emanated from a lofty source.

In an address on this subject, delivered in 1870, Professor Huxley referred to the "singular unreality" of the knowledge of physiology possessed by candidates who appeared before him. "The knowledge I have looked for," he adds, "was a real, precise, thorough, and practical knowledge of fundamentals; whereas, that which the best of the candidates, in a large proportion of cases, have had to give me was a large, extensive, and inaccurate knowledge of superstructure."

It is my purpose to show, by a few quotations, that much the same state

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