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Article
June 10, 1905

EPILEPSY OF SYPHILITIC ORIGIN.

Author Affiliations

Associate in Clinical Medicine and Lecturer on Mental and Nervous Diseases, Medical Department University of Texas. GALVESTON, TEXAS.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(23):1855. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500500035003a
Abstract

This patient was admitted to the nervous service of the John Sealy Hospital Dec. 28, 1904. The case presented a number of interesting features.

Patient.  —J. S., male, white, widower, aged 35; is a dairyman and general laborer. He uses alcohol moderately, has no drug habits, but chews and smokes tobacco; his sanitary surroundings are fair; he takes plenty of time in eating and has a good appetie.

History.  —His father and mother are living and in good health; one brother was poisoned, other brother and a sister are in good health, except that one of them has "liver trouble" of some kind. The patient has had measles and pneumonia. He says he received an injury over the right eye about five and a half years ago which "mashed in" the skull slightly. His physician called it a fracture of the skull. He had an attack of a similar nature

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