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Article
June 10, 1905

HISTORY OF THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF TRANSYLVANIA UNIVEBSITY.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(23):1856-1857. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02500500036005
Abstract

It is of interest and of profit, in these rushing times, occasionally to pause for a survey of past events and to note how institutions and men, once prominent, fade into the indistinct and well-nigh forgotten past. The "History of the Medical Department of Transylvania University,"1 just published, gives, for the first time, a complete sketch of one of the most interesting medical institutions in America, of which now not even the name remains. Born of the growing demand for learning in the Trans-Allegheny region and fostered by the difficulties of travel across the mountains, the little school at Lexington grew with phenomenal rapidity to a position second to none in the United States. In the thirty-nine years of its active life (1817-1857) there were 6,456 students enrolled and not less than 1,881 graduated from this, the first medical school founded in the West. The author, Dr. Peter, was

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