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November 29, 1902

THE PLACE AND IMPORTANCE IN THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM OF PHARMACY.

JAMA. 1902;XXXIX(22):1390-1392. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.52480480032001h

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Abstract

The medical college curriculum is a course of didactic and clinical study laid out by experienced medical men and intended to take the medical student over such work as will best prepare him to enter on the practice of medicine and surgery. Like all plans or outlines intended to guarantee a structure that will withstand the assaults of time they require a proper foundation, and this we may call the preliminary education of the student; then, upon this foundation the medical curriculum should rise with the elementary years in medical schools filled with thdse broad and ever-broadening basic studies upon which the practice of medicine was founded, and from whose increasing breadth and depth the modern practice of medicine has received its nourishment, and is continuing to receive a daily stimulus.

PRELIMINARY EDUCATION.  The common school education, while never considered broad enough, was formerly thought to be enough for a

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