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Article
December 6, 1902

THE MICROSCOPE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF SCARLET FEVER.

JAMA. 1902;XXXIX(23):1445-1448. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.52480490017001d
Abstract

Since Dr. W. J. Class1 called the attention of the medical profession to the causative germ of scarlet fever, I have been in a position to learn the value of the microscope in the early diagnosis of this disease.

In the year 1894 there was established at my residence by the Chicago Health Department a sub-laboratory for the examination of cultures from anginas. It was at first only intended to assist in the diagnosis of diphtheria, but it was soon found that the culture gave more or less valuable evidence in almost every disease which attacks the respiratory tract. In differentiating influenza from other inflammations it is invaluable. The extensive use of the culture has demonstrated to me that the term pneumonia is a general one, and that there are several germs that are capable of causing a pneumonic condition in the lung tissue.

The term pneumonia is as

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