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Article
December 6, 1902

THE TREATMENT OF FRACTURES OF THE LOWER END OF THE RADIUS.

JAMA. 1902;XXXIX(23):1448-1453. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.52480490020001e
Abstract

The modus operandi of reduction in fracture of the lower radial end depends, as in all fractures, on the type of displacement. In the majority of cases the fragment is directed upward so that there is a dorsal prominence. The joint not being concerned in such cases, generally called typical Colles' fractures, the shape of the deformed wrist resembles that of a bayonet or a fork. The Roentgen rays have shown, however, that the upward displacement, as a rule, is associated with sideward displacement, generally in the outward direction, causing radial inversion and consequently slight shortening of the radial axis. In such cases the clinical diagnosis is not difficult. The lower fragment pushes toward the dorsum, at which a prominence is seen, near the wrist, corresponding to a groove at the site of the upper end of the fragment. The upper (diaphyseal) fragment presses against the flexors, producing a prominence

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