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Article
July 7, 1900

EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL NOTES ON THE SUBARACHNOID SPACE.

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(1):6-10. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620270006001a
Abstract

From the exclusive domain of anatomy and physiology the meningeal route has made its way through the work of clinicians, to the sphere of practical medicine and surgery. To Quincke is due the credit of having demonstarted the innocuousness of subarachnoid lumbar puncture, its facility of execution, and the harmlessness of the withdrawal of a considerable amount of cerebrospinal fluid. Soon after Quincke made his original communication concerning "lumbal puncture," scores of physicians, in their enthusiasm for this new mode of relieving intradural pressure, predicted the curability of many diseases of the cerebrospinal system, previously deemed hopeless. In epilepsy, tuberculous meningitis and general paralysis many expected wonderful results. The German school, for example, singularly oblivious to the diffuse and deep cellular lesions present in tuberculosis of the meninges —the best known of all meningeal infections—adopted lumbar puncture as a logical and valuable therapeutic measure. A few doubtful cases of temporary

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