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Article
July 7, 1900

DISEASES OF THE PANCREAS.REVIEW OF THE PRESENT STATUS OF KNOWLEDGE CONCERNING THEM.

Author Affiliations

DES MOINES, IOWA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(1):19-21. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620270019001f
Abstract

The difficulties in diagnosing pancreatic affections are so numerous and gigantic that we rarely find a case in literature where a correct diagnosis has been made before operation or necropsy. However, there are some, and this fact should prove a powerful stimulus to all medical men in their study of this organ. Within recent years, more attention has been given to the pancreas than hitherto, and with results quite gratifying. To these the writer wishes to call attention, with the hope of arousing greater interest in these affections.

Pancreatic hemorrhage may occur as small infiltrations diffused through all or a part of the gland, or it may consist of a large effusion of blood into the gland and the surrounding tissues. Anders1 has collected 40 cases of pancreatic hemorrhage, and in all except 1, there was hemorrhagic infiltration into the gland itself. In 17 cases, the structures around the

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