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Article
April 2, 1898

THE DIAGNOSIS OF ARTERIAL, MENINGEAL AND CEREBRAL DISEASE DUE TO SYPHILIS.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(14):798-799. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.02440660046005

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Abstract

There are few problems in neurology which puzzle the specialist and the general practitioner more than the differential diagnosis of intracranial disease due to syphilis, except the symptoms be peculiarly frank and well developed. The difficulties in the case are also often greatly increased by the absolute denial on the part of the patient that he has ever been a victim of this specific infection, a denial which may be conscientiously made, for it is to be remembered that nervous syphilis often develops in persons many years after the primary infection and without any intermediate secondary lesions. Further than this it is not to be forgotten that syphilis may be innocently acquired, although such cases, in males at least, are rare.

The symptoms of intracranial syphilis closely resemble other forms of cephalic lesion and are doubtless often considered as true or simple meningitis, thrombosis or hemorrhage, yet a diagnosis of

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