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Article
October 31, 1891

THE ACTION OF THE TURKISH BATH IN DISEASE.Read in the Section of Medicine and Physiology, at the Forty-second Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, held at Washington, D. C., May, 1891.

Author Affiliations

OF BROOKLYN, N. Y.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(18):679-682. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410960017001d

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Abstract

One year ago, I had the honor of presenting before this Association certain data regarding the treatment of rheumatism by the Turkish bath. Several gentlemen controverted the position taken in that paper, and now it will be my endeavor to give some facts substantiating what was then laid before you, under the title of

THE ACTION OF THE TURKISH BATH IN DISEASE.

The Turkish bath is simply a convenient manner of applying heat to the body, and is readily adapted to any diseased condition. It is not exhausting, as many suppose, nor is its salutary influence measured by its power to produce abundant sweating. One of the most remarkable properties of the bath is its ability to allay the sense of fatigue. There is an invigoration arising from the contact of the vitalized skin with the dry heat of the bath, which gives an increased power of drinking in oxygen,

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