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October 31, 1891

FRIEDRICH'S ATAXIA; ITS RELATION TO THE CONDUCTING PATHS IN THE SPINAL CORD.

Author Affiliations

OF DETROIT, MICH.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(18):687-688. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410960025001g

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Abstract

At the Congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. David Inglis, of Detroit, read a paper upon the above subject before the American Neurological Association.

He reports in brief, a case of Friedrich's ataxia, in a boy of six years of age, in which the symptoms conformed accurately to Friedrich's own summary of the characters of the disease, viz.: "Impairment in the combination and harmony of movements developing gradually and spreading from the lower to the upper half of the body, and always involving finally the organs of speech; sensibility and the functions of the special senses and of the brain being intact; paralysis of the sphincters and trophic disturbances are absent; less common phenomena are curvature of the spine, sensations of vertigo and nystagmus. From a clinical point of view we must regard the disease as a progressive paralysis of the faculty of combination of movements."

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