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Article
April 9, 1898

A CASE OF MENINGOMYELITIS, RESEMBLING IN SOME RESPECTS LANDRY'S PARALYSIS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO TUBERCULOUS MENINGOMYELITIS.FROM THE WILLIAM PEPPER CLINICAL LABORATORY, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE PHILADELPHIA POLYCLINIC; ASSOCIATE IN THE WILLIAM PEPPER CLINICAL LABORATORY. PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(15):817-824. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440670005002
Abstract

The case which is reported in this paper was studied clinically by Dr. James Hendrie Lloyd, during one of his terms of service at the Philadelphia Hospital, and the clinical notes were taken by him.

J. H. A. was 40 years of age at the time of admission to the Philadelphia Hospital, June 27, 1894. He gave no history of hereditary disease, and stated that previous to his present illness he had always been in good health, with the exception of a constant sick headache, which he had had since the age of 3 years. This was sometimes accompanied by vomiting. No treatment gave him relief. During the year previous the headache had been growing less severe, and during the two months before his entrance into the hospital it had ceased entirely. He denied having used alcohol, or having had venereal disease. In earlier life he had been a school

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