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Article
November 14, 1891

THE DIAGNOSIS OF TRAUMATIC LESIONS IN THE CEREBRO-SPINAL AXIS AND THE DETECTION OF MALINGERING REFERRED TO THIS CENTRE.

Author Affiliations

CONSULTING SURGEON TO THE BAYONNE HOSPITAL, SURGEON TO THE JERSEY CITY HOSPITAL, ETC., JERSEY CITY, N. J.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(20):744-750. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410980002001a
Abstract

The counterfeit can not be detected without an accurate knowledge of the genuine, and in addition to this an exact knowledge of the counterfeit, and likewise a definite knowledge of the difference between the genuine and counterfeit, is still imperatively required.

It therefore follows that he who would attempt to detect malingering should always be able to diagnose concussion of the brain and spinal cord. The proper performance of this task requires a full knowledge of the etiology, semeiology and pathology of the morbid condition under consideration. Let us, therefore, direct our attention to these essential factors of diagnosis—carefully analyzing each—in order that we may more thoroughly comprehend their relation and bearing on each other. It is universally admitted that concussion of the spinal cord most commonly follows falls upon the feet, buttocks, less frequently on the hands when both arms are outstretched, gun-shot wounds involving portions of the spinal

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