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Article
August 11, 1900

THE NECESSITY FOR THE ISOLATION OF CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS IN HOSPITALS.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(6):359. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460320029007
Abstract

In conformity with the guiding principles of modern hygienic requirements the two most important indications in the management of all infectious diseases are isolation and disinfection. While there is no marked dissent from this general proposition, occasionally objection is raised to its universal, and particularly its rigid, application. This is especially the case with regard to tuberculosis, in the repression of which great activity has recently been exhibited in various ways and in many places. The question as to whether isolation of tuberculous patients in hospitals is necessary is answered virtually in the negative in a recent communication by Aron1, who points out that in justification of the demands for the erection of special hospitals and special departments for tuberculous patients attention is generally directed to the dangers to which those surrounding such individuals are exposed. Long before its cause had been discovered, tuberculosis was known to be a

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