[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 11, 1900

THE DIETETIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LIGHT AND DARK MEAT.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(6):361-362. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460320031015
Abstract

It has long been the custom under certain morbid conditions to exclude meat from the diet on the supposition that the products of its catabolism exert an irritating effect more particularly on the kidneys, and proscription has been made to apply especially to red meat. Among these contraindicating conditions are the uric-acid diathesis, epilepsy, and chronic nephritis. It has been thought that red meat contains more extractives and ptomaines than white meat, of which the former are especialy injurious to the kidneys. More recently, however, it has been contended that, chemically at least, there is really little difference between red meat and white meat, with the implication that, dietetically, the one is not more injurious in its effects than the other. For the purpose of removing some of the doubt in which this subject seems involved, Pabst1 undertook a series of experimental observations upon the influence of various diets

×