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Article
April 9, 1898

A CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC REPORT OF A CASE OF PROGRESSIVE DEMENTIA.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(15):837-842. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440670025002e
Abstract

The case under consideration presents the following history:

Patient aged 64 years; married; has had five children, three of whom are living and in good health. She was always of a nervous, somewhat irritable, temperament, but mentally bright and clever, with linguistic and other accomplishments. After the birth of her first child she had an attack of mania; when about 23 years of age she had an attack of chorea which lasted several weeks. At 35 years of age, apparently as the result of unusual worriment owing to sickness, she became more irritable and her temper was afterward capricious. For about ten years previous to her death she was subject to spells of excitement which almost amounted to transient derangement, but she had no tangible delusions, although she had a tendency to persecutory ideas, frequently believing without cause that she was abused and ill-treated by others. During the same period

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